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Symposium 2014

Delivering Inclusive Social Security in Asia—What Works and What Doesn’t?

The Challenge

Over the past decades, emerging economies in Asia have experienced fast economic growth, which has brought—though not equally distributed—large income gains to the majority of the population and lifted millions out of poverty. Yet, most of these countries still face a high degree of vulnerability—both at the macro level (e.g. triggered or at least aggravated by volatile capital in- and outflows) as well as at the micro level (e.g. caused by illness, invalidity or death of the bread winner)—which threatens to wipe out much of the progress achieved. Against this background, there is growing public demand in Asia for inclusive social security mechanisms to reduce socio-economic risks or mitigate their effects.

Social security systems are important drivers of social and economic development. Among others, they reduce poverty, inequality and vulnerability, enhance social mobility and cohesion, contribute to a healthier, better educated and more productive population and stimulate economic growth. However, designing, expanding and upholding social security systems is a very complex endeavor. Small mistakes in the early stage of the process can be very costly and hard to correct. Although there are, of course, no one-size-fits-all solutions, emerging countries can profit immensely from sharing lessons learnt with their peers. Furthermore, developed countries can serve both as role models and as deterrent examples. Many proposals on how to deliver inclusive social security in Asia are on the table; the key question is what works in terms of quick, large-scale and sustainable results.


Session Successful Policy Design for Social Security Systems

This session aims at addressing the following questions: How can emerging countries build up and maintain strong political commitment and achieve broad social consensus to reform their social security systems? What are key DOs and DON’Ts in the design phase? What interconnections between different parts of the social security system (i.e. health and labor) should be taken into account? How can the social security system be both predictable and adaptive? What are the main challenges in moving from a selective to a more universal approach? More specifically, how can currently excluded groups—especially the informal sector—be integrated into the social security system? How can financial sustainability be achieved in light of demographic changes, fallouts of economic crises and fiscal constraints?

This session is organized in cooperation with Bertelsmann Stiftung.

 

Session Successful Implementation of Health System Reforms

This session will address recent experiences in the practical implementation of large-scale health system reforms as well as their day-to-day management in Asian countries and beyond. Special emphasis will be put on: What degree of public subsidies is necessary to increase the coverage of the informal sector and other currently excluded groups? What incentives and payment mechanisms should be put in place to ensure high-quality services as well as bridge the “last mile” in health care delivery? What is the optimal division of labor between the public and the private sector in delivering more universal health protection? What role can IT play to make the administration transparent, lean and cost-effective?

This session is organized in cooperation with GIZ.

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    Towards Fair and Sustainable Road to Modern Health Care

    Introduction 1. There are three separate medical insurance systems in China, Medical insurance for urban residents(MIUR), Basic medical insurance for urban employees(BMIUE), New Rural Co-operative Me ...

    Introduction 1. There are three separate medical insurance systems in China, Medical insurance for urban residents(MIUR), Basic medical insurance for urban employees(BMIUE), New Rural Co-operative Medical Insurance (NRCMI). 2. Though the types of social medical insurances sounds to be adequate, especially when compared to many developed countries, they do not cover the whole nation. 3. Reducing the unfairness within three existing insurance systems becomes more necessary and urgent. Challenges 1. Separate medical insurances in recent China are no longer in pace with the high speed of urbanization under which the number of rural residents declines. Can people still benefit from the new

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    Introduce Opportunities and Programs for Re-skilling

    Labour markets are going to change faster and faster and the notion of having one job or one career is long gone. As an individual we need to accept that we will be let go several times during our act ...

    Labour markets are going to change faster and faster and the notion of having one job or one career is long gone. As an individual we need to accept that we will be let go several times during our active age, and we will have to be adaptive to change in order to be employable. We cannot save every single job, but we can work with the employability of our work force. Therefore, a progressive government can assist in making its citizens more employable by giving them opportunities to re-skill during their career. A re-skilling program could either be financed

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Background Paper

    Background Paper
    Symposium 2014

    Successful Policy Design for Social Security Systems

    Over the past decades, emerging economies in Asia have experienced fast economic growth, which has brought – though not equally distributed – large income gains to the majority of the population a ...

    Over the past decades, emerging economies in Asia have experienced fast economic growth, which has brought – though not equally distributed – large income gains to the majority of the population and lifted millions out of poverty. Yet, most of these countries still face a high degree of vulnerability – both at the macro level (e.g. triggered or at least aggravated by volatile capital in- and outflows) as well as at the micro level (e.g. caused by illness, invalidity or death of the bread winner) – which threatens to wipe out much of the progress achieved.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society