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Symposium 2009

Making Migration Work after the Crisis

The Challenge

International labor migration promotes economic development in sending countries and can help overcome skill shortages and demographic problems in host countries. Nevertheless, many of these potential benefits are not realized because immigration policies are often too restrictive and not harmonized between host and sending countries.

Two aspects appear to be crucial in making migration more beneficial for both sides. First, host countries should take more responsibility for economically and socially integrating immigrants in their societies. Second, host and sending countries should cooperate to provide migrants with more flexible migration opportunities and incentives to return.

What are benchmarks for successful policies for the economic integration and social inclusion of immigrants? Specifically, what is the relative importance of flexible labor markets vs. activist government policies in fields like community development, schooling, language skills, and training in cultural awareness?

What is the role of civil society and the business community in promoting migrants’ labor market integration and eliminating discrimination against migrants? Should temporary migration schemes be promoted? Should immigrants have differential access to the welfare state? How can social security contributions and benefits be made portable across countries? How can Diasporas contribute more effectively to economic and social development in their home countries?

    Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2009

    Use bilateral agreements between sending and host countries >> to liberalize migration regulation for those who do not compete with vulnerable host groups, >> to expand ...

    Use bilateral agreements between sending and host countries >> to liberalize migration regulation for those who do not compete with vulnerable host groups, >> to expand legal migration, ...

    Use bilateral agreements between sending and host countries >> to liberalize migration regulation for those who do not compete with vulnerable host groups, >> to expand legal migration, if needed by restricting access to social transfers in the host country, and >> to ensure safe and equitable treatment of migrants by establishing labor standards and certificates for intermediaries.

    Polity
    Solution
    Symposium 2009

    Conduct a full public debate on immigration and integration policy and promote a comprehensive benchmarking of good practices beyond European countries and regular migration.

    Conduct a full public debate on immigration and integration policy and promote a comprehensive benchmarking of good practices beyond European countries and regular migration.

    Conduct a full public debate on immigration and integration policy and promote a comprehensive benchmarking of good practices beyond European countries and regular migration.

    Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2009

    Continue the expansion of migration opportunities with measures to provide information and support to migrants throughout the migration process, including by private sector providers of human resource services.

    Continue the expansion of migration opportunities with measures to provide information and support to migrants throughout the migration process, including by private sector providers of human resource ...

    Continue the expansion of migration opportunities with measures to provide information and support to migrants throughout the migration process, including by private sector providers of human resource services.

    Polity, Business

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2009

    Making Migration Work after the Crisis - Solutions

    Expand temporary work programs for low-to-medium skilled workers. Such programs could be targeted to occupations or labor market segments where immigrants will compete less intensely with host country ...

    Expand temporary work programs for low-to-medium skilled workers. Such programs could be targeted to occupations or labor market segments where immigrants will compete less intensely with host country residents. Migrants would be obliged to return home after a set period; therefore, their access to host country social transfers could be limited and their social security contributions (except for health insurance) could be channeled to home country social security systems. Temporary work programs would typically be based on bilateral agreements between home and host countries. While such programs have not been trouble-free in the past, they would expand legal migration without

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2009

    Comments on possible solutions

    While focusing on “after the crisis” is terribly important, there are many things that governments & societies can do about immigration during the crisis. Among them, three seem particularly impor ...

    While focusing on “after the crisis” is terribly important, there are many things that governments & societies can do about immigration during the crisis. Among them, three seem particularly important. (A) They must redouble their efforts on immigrant integration. There are at least two components to this. The first one may be that the crisis will reduce receiving countries’ commitment to investing on the education and training of non-citizens and immigrant origin populations with special needs. This concern is most relevant in places where financing for such initiatives is most uncertain and categorical distinctions on the basis of legal

    Polity, Academia, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2009

    Identifying the Business Community’s need for migratory workers

    Even during times of crisis employers everywhere experience difficulties in finding the right skills to fill jobs. The demographic reality that many countries face will only exacerbate the issue. The ...

    Even during times of crisis employers everywhere experience difficulties in finding the right skills to fill jobs. The demographic reality that many countries face will only exacerbate the issue. The skill challenge is an issue that touches on a broad range of policies, one of which is labour migration. Migrant workers have played and continue to play an important role in filling labour shortages, yet much improvement is needed to meet the requirements of both business and workers. Better coordination between sending and receiving countries is needed to enhance the effectiveness of labour migration and ensure respect for the rights

    Polity, Business