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Symposium 2008

Solution for Designing Immigration Policy

The Challenge

While the world is becoming more integrated through cheaper transport and communication, large income differences persist between rich and poor countries. As a result, the pressures to migrate from ...

While the world is becoming more integrated through cheaper transport and communication, large income differences persist between rich and poor countries. As a result, the pressures to migrate from poor to rich countries are rising. Migration among rich countries and among poor countries is also on the rise.

Create a standing commission on immigration and to adjust immigration levels flexibly in response to changing market and institutional conditions.

Market conditions relevant to immigration may change due to shifts in labor market institutions and in welfare state provisions, as well as business cycle movement and demographic variations. Furthermore, even when countries are very similar regarding their desired level of low-skilled immigration, their mix of irregular immigration, family-based migration and legal economic migration may be very different.

To adjust immigration policy in a timely manner when any of these relevant parameters change, each country should establish a standing commission on labor markets and immigration to facilitate the flexible adjustment of immigration policy to changing conditions. The standing commission should make recommendations to the government every two years.

    Related Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Redesign low-skill immigration policies through a combination of implementable restrictions and feasible border enforcement. Thereby channel illegal migration into legal employment.

    Redesign low-skill immigration policies through a combination of implementable restrictions and feasible border enforcement. Thereby channel illegal migration into legal employment.

    Redesign low-skill immigration policies through a combination of implementable restrictions and feasible border enforcement. Thereby channel illegal migration into legal employment.

    Polity, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Give irregular immigrants the opportunity and incentives to integrate through continuous “earned regularization” leading to naturalization.

    Give irregular immigrants the opportunity and incentives to integrate through continuous “earned regularization” leading to naturalization.

    Give irregular immigrants the opportunity and incentives to integrate through continuous “earned regularization” leading to naturalization.

    Polity, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Make immigration policies for high-skilled immigrants much more open, such as by introducing a “blue card” for immigrants to the EU. Don´t allow concerns about a possible brain drain to ...

    Make immigration policies for high-skilled immigrants much more open, such as by introducing a “blue card” for immigrants to the EU. Don´t allow concerns about a possible brain drain to stop the ...

    Make immigration policies for high-skilled immigrants much more open, such as by introducing a “blue card” for immigrants to the EU. Don´t allow concerns about a possible brain drain to stop the opening of labor markets for high-skilled immigrants.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Implement high-skilled immigration programs that rely on broad-based notions of skill, rather than the traditional notion of short-run “skill shortages.”

    Implement high-skilled immigration programs that rely on broad-based notions of skill, rather than the traditional notion of short-run “skill shortages.”

    Implement high-skilled immigration programs that rely on broad-based notions of skill, rather than the traditional notion of short-run “skill shortages.”

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society