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Symposium 2008

The Crisis of Water Management

The Challenge

A global 'water crisis' looms large for many developing countries. Managing the world’s water supplies involves navigating the conflicting needs arising from economic growth, poverty, food security, political stability and climate change. How can water be used more productively in developing countries?

How can water waste be reduced, water sanitation be increased, new water sources be used, and existing water sources be conserved? How do local circumstances determine the optimal mix of these strategies? How are the demands of economic markets (cost recovery and user financing) to be reconciled with the demands for equitable access to water and poverty reduction? What policy framework (e.g. regulations and taxes) is desirable for achieving efficient and equitable water supply? What business opportunities will emerge that could contribute to satisfying the world's need for water? Should water be reserved for food production, or can food security equally be guaranteed through trade, by importing food rather than growing it?

    Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Support infrastructure investment to increase the supply of water for farmers, households and industries, particularly in developing countries.

    Support infrastructure investment to increase the supply of water for farmers, households and industries, particularly in developing countries.

    Support infrastructure investment to increase the supply of water for farmers, households and industries, particularly in developing countries.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Provide policy support for water recycling, reuse and leak repair.

    Provide policy support for water recycling, reuse and leak repair.

    Provide policy support for water recycling, reuse and leak repair.

    Polity
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Promote the increase crop output per unit of water input, through R&D leading to better crop cultivars (including drought resistance), better farm management and better soil water storage.

    Promote the increase crop output per unit of water input, through R&D leading to better crop cultivars (including drought resistance), better farm management and better soil water storage.

    Promote the increase crop output per unit of water input, through R&D leading to better crop cultivars (including drought resistance), better farm management and better soil water storage.

    Academia, Business
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Improve water governance worldwide, through transparent water property rights, water pricing and movement toward free agricultural trade.

    Improve water governance worldwide, through transparent water property rights, water pricing and movement toward free agricultural trade.

    Improve water governance worldwide, through transparent water property rights, water pricing and movement toward free agricultural trade.

    Polity

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Statement on the Crisis of Water Management

    We at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) suggest three broad strategies for national governments, international donors, and water users to address the current and emerging water ...

    We at the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) suggest three broad strategies for national governments, international donors, and water users to address the current and emerging water crisis: increase the supply of water for farmers, households, and industries by investing in infrastructure; conserve water and make existing systems more efficient by reforming water management and policy and investing in improved technology and infrastructure in these systems; and increase crop productivity per unit of water and land by improving water management and directing research and policy efforts toward rain-fed agriculture. Urban and industrial water demand, climate change impacts, and water

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    The Crisis of Water Management: Response

    The situation with water today is similar to that with cropland a half century ago. During the 1950s when we projected world population growth to the end of the century we realized that even then ther ...

    The situation with water today is similar to that with cropland a half century ago. During the 1950s when we projected world population growth to the end of the century we realized that even then there was little new land to bring under the plow. In response, the world launched a systematic effort to raise grainland productivity by investing in research, replacing ceiling prices for agricultural commodities with support prices, expanding farm credit, and investing in agricultural infrastructure. As a result world grain yield per hectare has nearly tripled since 1950. We need to do the same thing with

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Water crisis in not a technical problem

    Affordable and safe water supply is imperative for the future economic growth and stability in developing countries.  The challenges facing water supply and safety are complex, yet not insurmountable ...

    Affordable and safe water supply is imperative for the future economic growth and stability in developing countries.  The challenges facing water supply and safety are complex, yet not insurmountable.  They are manageable, if we act deliberately and collectively and place a higher economic and political priority on clean water. Traditionally, we have undervalued the worth of water and have under funded projects capable of delivering a sustainable supply. Better infrastructure, conservation and education—along with innovative technology--will provide a sustainable future for our water resources.  We expect that new product developments will primarily be focused on the economics of the

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    The Crisis of Watermanagement

    Prof. Joachim Bitterlich "The principle of all things is water; everything consists of water and everything returns into water" (Thales of Milet in Goethes Faust) Basic assumptions Health risks, clima ...

    Prof. Joachim Bitterlich "The principle of all things is water; everything consists of water and everything returns into water" (Thales of Milet in Goethes Faust) Basic assumptions Health risks, climate change, waste of resources, continuous growth of population and ongoing trends towards living in cities have made water one of the most valuable and politically sensitive resources. The shortage of water is in the great majority of countries not the central trouble, but its intelligent management. Irresponsible management of water risks contributing to a considerable threat for peace and stability, health and prosperity of nations. This challenge needs an

    Polity, Business
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    The Crisis of Water Management

    Solutions need to be tailored to specific, widely varying natural, cultural, economic and political circumstances. In developing countries, water is still predominantly used by the agricultural sector ...

    Solutions need to be tailored to specific, widely varying natural, cultural, economic and political circumstances. In developing countries, water is still predominantly used by the agricultural sector, in particular for irrigation (see graph), which suggests that a successful strategy for overcoming the water crisis has to focus on this sector. Research undertaken by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) point to three broad strategies for national governments, international donors, and water users: increase the supply of water for farmers, households, and industries by investing in infrastructure; conserve water and make existing systems

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society