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Symposium 2008

Global Policy Responses to Climate Change

The Challenge

While fossil fuels are essential for growth in practically all economies, the resulting greenhouse gas emissions have serious adverse global effects on our climate. Dealing with this problem requires global cooperation.

Are there preferable alternatives to the cap-and-trade system of the Kyoto Protocol? Should the coming climate negotiations be global level or include just the major emitters? How should the costs of the policy collaboration be distributed among developing and developed countries?

If global, what institutional architecture for climate negotiations is desirable? Is there a case for creating a new international institution (analogous to the IMF) to deal with climate change, or can existing institutions handle the task?

What is the role of international technology cooperation and adaptation measures to climate change?

    Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Support research and development and eliminate barriers to technology transfer.

    Support research and development and eliminate barriers to technology transfer.

    Support research and development and eliminate barriers to technology transfer.

    Polity, Academia, Business
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    In the medium run, establish a global price of carbon, reflecting the environmental cost.

    In the medium run, establish a global price of carbon, reflecting the environmental cost.

    In the medium run, establish a global price of carbon, reflecting the environmental cost.

    Polity
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    In the short run, include all countries responsible for substantial greenhouse gas emissions in an international agreement to reduce them; then make steady progress towards a globally inclusive agreement.

    In the short run, include all countries responsible for substantial greenhouse gas emissions in an international agreement to reduce them; then make steady progress towards a globally inclusive agreem ...

    In the short run, include all countries responsible for substantial greenhouse gas emissions in an international agreement to reduce them; then make steady progress towards a globally inclusive agreement.

    Polity
    Solution
    Symposium 2008

    Give developing countries support in adaptation and adoption of best practice technologies.

    Give developing countries support in adaptation and adoption of best practice technologies.

    Give developing countries support in adaptation and adoption of best practice technologies.

    Polity

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Comments to the Global Policy Responses to Climate Change

    Summary (No comment means that I agree with the summary) Are there preferable alternatives to the cap-and-trade system of the Kyoto Protocol? A system of taxes or fees is potentially preferable. Price ...

    Summary (No comment means that I agree with the summary) Are there preferable alternatives to the cap-and-trade system of the Kyoto Protocol? A system of taxes or fees is potentially preferable. Price type systems can be designed to have many advantages. The choice between these two systems is very complex and it would probably be foolish to disregard the tax alternative too early. Should the coming climate negotiations be global level or include just the major emitters? It is vital to include large emitters. It may be preferable to start with a coalition of large emitters if such a coalition

    Polity, Academia, Business
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Global Policy Responses to Climate Change

      Any initiative in response to climate change has to be based on a few fundamental principles: Be effective It is common sense that everyone on this planet should use the scarce resources we have ef ...

      Any initiative in response to climate change has to be based on a few fundamental principles: Be effective It is common sense that everyone on this planet should use the scarce resources we have efficiently and sustainably. Efficient use of energy resources – both fossil as well as renewable – will have an immediate and direct economic effect, reduce the specific ecological footprint, and limit if not reduce the global ecological impact. This can only be achieved effectively if the same general principles are applied globally. Any strategy that is not universally binding and that allows major players to

    Polity, Business
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Incentives and Institutions. A Bottom-up Climate Policy Framework

    1. Background An effective control of climate change can only be achieved by reducing GHG emissions well below the 1990 levels, i.e. the Kyoto Protocol is largely insufficient because: many countries ...

    1. Background An effective control of climate change can only be achieved by reducing GHG emissions well below the 1990 levels, i.e. the Kyoto Protocol is largely insufficient because: many countries are not committed to reduce emissions committed countries do not have ambitious targets A post-Kyoto post-2012 strategy must focus on enhancing participation (incremental evolution) and improving policy design to lower emissions (structural evolution). The development and diffusion of low carbon technologies will be central to providing safe, secure, sustainable and affordable energy to a growing world economy over the 21st century. 2. The incentive problem

    Polity
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Submission to the Global Policy Responses to Climate Change

    Overview The existence of climate change is unequivocal and one of the most pressing challenges of our time. Rio Tinto recognizes that addressing the climate change challenge will require significant ...

    Overview The existence of climate change is unequivocal and one of the most pressing challenges of our time. Rio Tinto recognizes that addressing the climate change challenge will require significant changes in global energy, transport, land management, industrial and community systems and infrastructure. Climate change is a business issue for Rio Tinto: Our operations emit greenhouse gases. Also our metals and minerals value chains play a broader role in global emissions and mitigation opportunity. Government climate policy, and changes in climate systems, will impact the growth potential, operability and cost structure of our business. Business and industry are increasingly

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Global Policy responses to Climate Change

    The most likely starting point for a future climate regime is the Kyoto Protocol and the results of the negotiations in Bali. Other proposals for a future climate regime that have been discussed previ ...

    The most likely starting point for a future climate regime is the Kyoto Protocol and the results of the negotiations in Bali. Other proposals for a future climate regime that have been discussed previous to the “Bali Road Map” seem to be off the negotiating table. Since mitigating global warming requires substantial cuts in global greenhouse gas emissions the decisive issue is clearly a participation that is broad in terms of emissions, not necessarily in terms of countries – and compliance. In this respect it might be more promising to start with a core group of major emitters instead of

    Polity, Business
    Proposal
    Symposium 2008

    Incentives and Institutions. A Bottom-up Climate Policy Framework

    1. Background An effective control of climate change can only be achieved by reducing GHG emissions well below the 1990 levels, i.e. the Kyoto Protocol is largely insufficient because: many countries ...

    1. Background An effective control of climate change can only be achieved by reducing GHG emissions well below the 1990 levels, i.e. the Kyoto Protocol is largely insufficient because: many countries are not committed to reduce emissions committed countries do not have ambitious targets A post-Kyoto post-2012 strategy must focus on enhancing participation (incremental evolution) and improving policy design to lower emissions (structural evolution). The development and diffusion of low carbon technologies will be central to providing safe, secure, sustainable and affordable energy to a growing world economy over the 21st century. 2. The incentive problem

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society