You are here: Home Knowledge Base Environment Climate Change and Economic Development Proposals Climate Change and Economic Development
Symposium 2010

Proposal - Climate Change and Economic Development

The Challenge

Climate change poses the serious challenge of carbon dioxide emission reduction. Emission control by developing countries is becoming a key for effective mitigation of climate change, as those count ...

Climate change poses the serious challenge of carbon dioxide emission reduction. Emission control by developing countries is becoming a key for effective mitigation of climate change, as those countries now account for more than a half of global emissions and are still expanding their energy infrastructure.

1. Urge multinationals to use clean technologies in all their worldwide business operations.

This could be done for example by WTO regulations urging multinationals to use the technology standards of their home country in all their international production sites and all daughter companies - thereby avoiding the transfer of environmentally damaging production to developing countries. Alternatively companies could be given emission credits for the transfer of clean technologies to developing countries, if a global emission cap and trade system could be set up.

2. Further the Kyoto Protocol mechanisms of CDM and JI.

The Kyoto Protocol mechanisms should be developed further, but most importantly the process must be more effective than the Kyoto Protocol.
The next global climate regime needs effective means of enforcement and sanctions against non-complying treaty members and against free-riders (non-members to the treaty) in the international community.

3. Bring about equitable burden sharing.

A global transfer fund financed by developed countries should help developing countries acquire the technological capacities for climate change mitigation and be used as a vehicle for transfer of clean technologies from developed to developing countries.
Oxfam has made a proposal on how adaptation to climate change should be funded: nations should pay according to the amount of carbon dioxide emissions they produce per capita, coupled with their position on the human development index. On this basis, the US would supply more than 40% of the money and the European Union over 30%, with Japan, Canada, Australia and South Korea making up the balance.

4. Develop a global system of carbon pricing.

This can be done through carbon taxes or through tradable permits, whereby other GHGs are converted into CO2-equivalents.
Currently, a wide variety of policy instruments are used to reduce GHG emissions: quantitative restrictions, biofuel targets, technological specifications, voluntary restraints, etc. Many of those instruments could be effectively replaced by carbon pricing systems that are compatible with each other internationally.

5. Introduce a Tobin tax/Robin Hood tax.

The idea of a small 0.01% tax on all financial transactions is gaining a new wave of popularity. This tax could be used to finance mitigation and adaption on climate change, first of all in developing countries, but in the long run also world-wide.

6. Establish an international environmental organization.

World governments should establish a strong international environmental organization with the power to oversee the interrelated issues of climate change mitigation and adaptation, trade liberalization, climate change induced migration, and equity issues between developed and developing countries. The organization would facilitate global cost-sharing for mitigation and adaption on climate change and would administer a global mitigation and adaption fund.

    Related Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2010

    The Barefoot Approach: Women Barefoot Solar Engineers of Africa

    The Women Barefoot Solar Engineers of Africa aim to improve the lives of the rural poor living on less than $ 1 a day in remote inaccessible villages off the energy grids in the 21 least developed cou ...

    The Women Barefoot Solar Engineers of Africa aim to improve the lives of the rural poor living on less than $ 1 a day in remote inaccessible villages off the energy grids in the 21 least developed countries in Africa supplying their communities with clean, low cost, household lighting from solar energy. Since 2005 more than 140 women from Africa, many of them grandmothers, almost all of them illiterate, have trained at the Barefoot College in India. In 6 months, these women learned how to fabricate, install and maintain solar-powered household lighting systems, and have become Barefoot Solar Engineers transforming

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2010

    Contribution from Dato Ir. Lee Yee-Cheong, Malaysia

    In the GES 2010 Preview on this Panel, the Burden to ameliorate the adverse effects of Climate Change is placed on the Developing World. “Emission control by developing countries is becoming a key f ...

    In the GES 2010 Preview on this Panel, the Burden to ameliorate the adverse effects of Climate Change is placed on the Developing World. “Emission control by developing countries is becoming a key for effective mitigation of climate change, as those countries now account for more than a half of global emissions and are still expanding their energy infrastructure.” I beg to differ! The Burden rests primarily on the Developed World. The World in Year 2000 (According to Professor John Holdren, then Harvard, now Science Advisor to US President Obama) World Population >6.0 billion (i)   Rich

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2010

    Contingent Climate-Change Treaties

    We probably can’t deal successfully with climate change without a strong international treaty limiting greenhouse gas emissions. But getting such a treaty is hard. One important reason is that reduc ...

    We probably can’t deal successfully with climate change without a strong international treaty limiting greenhouse gas emissions. But getting such a treaty is hard. One important reason is that reducing emissions is economically costly, but the costs of reduction are not publicly known. Thus, if a treaty negotiator proposes that country A reduce its carbon emissions by x%, that country may well object - especially if it is a developing country - that to do so would be prohibitively expensive -- and the negotiator would be hard pressed to prove the country wrong. That is where a contingent treaty

    Polity