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Symposium 2010

Climate Change and Economic Development

The Challenge

Climate change poses the serious challenge of carbon dioxide emission reduction. Emission control by developing countries is becoming a key for effective mitigation of climate change, as those countries now account for more than a half of global emissions and are still expanding their energy infrastructure.

Substantial emission reduction in developing countries would require strong policy commitments and subsequent investments in a green economy. Some highly efficient, emission-saving production technologies could already be implemented without technical complexities. The challenge is therefore how to bring these technologies to countries that do not have the financial means to invest in them.

The successful implementation could generate a “triple dividend,” that is, energy saving, emission reduction and job creation. In this sense climate change can be seen as a chance for economic development in these countries. Meanwhile, climate experts indicate that the damages of climate change will fall disproportionately on developing countries and particularly on the poor, which are the most vulnerable and least able to adapt. Those damages could inhibit economic development. The World Bank estimates that developing countries will need $145-$175 billion for mitigation and $30-$100 billion for adaptation annually by the year 2030. However, the amount of international funding is currently $9 billion for both measures combined.

There are two areas in which we need international solutions. The first is how to promote implementation of efficient technologies in developing countries. The second one is how to finance the adaption to climate change in developing countries. The first part can be solved not only on the political level, but to a high degree on a business level, particularly by multinational firms. How can we encourage the business sector in implementation of efficient technologies? What will be effective ways of public-private partnerships to achieve the goal? In order to solve the second part, there is a need for intensified communication between politics and development partners. How can we guarantee such communication given the multiplicity of institutions involving development assistance, which include bilateral aid organizations as well as multilateral ones such as UN institutions? Also, how should we set priorities in the distribution of funds (e.g., finding a balance between financial support of climate change adaptation and conventional development aid, streamlining funding bodies for climate change adaptation and for other types of development assistance)? Meanwhile, should governments also establish new mechanisms to raise such funds, such as the allocation of revenues from auctioning emission permits and the introduction of a new global tax (e.g., a Tobin tax)?

    Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2010

    Reduce uncertainty for industry and consumers by implementing carbon pricing policies.

    Reduce uncertainty for industry and consumers by implementing carbon pricing policies.

    Reduce uncertainty for industry and consumers by implementing carbon pricing policies.

    Polity, Business
    Solution
    Symposium 2010

    Develop contingent pricing solutions.

    Develop contingent pricing solutions.

    Develop contingent pricing solutions.

    Polity
    Solution
    Symposium 2010

    Think global, act local.

    Think global, act local.

    Think global, act local.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2010

    Ensure international policy coherence.

    Ensure international policy coherence.

    Ensure international policy coherence.

    Polity
    Solution
    Symposium 2010

    Deploy renewable energies in developing countries by learning from advanced examples.

    Deploy renewable energies in developing countries by learning from advanced examples.

    Deploy renewable energies in developing countries by learning from advanced examples.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2010

    Climate Change and Economic Development

    1. Urge multinationals to use clean technologies in all their worldwide business operations. This could be done for example by WTO regulations urging multinationals to use the technology standards of ...

    1. Urge multinationals to use clean technologies in all their worldwide business operations. This could be done for example by WTO regulations urging multinationals to use the technology standards of their home country in all their international production sites and all daughter companies - thereby avoiding the transfer of environmentally damaging production to developing countries. Alternatively companies could be given emission credits for the transfer of clean technologies to developing countries, if a global emission cap and trade system could be set up. 2. Further the Kyoto Protocol mechanisms of CDM and JI. The Kyoto Protocol mechanisms should be

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2010

    The Barefoot Approach: Women Barefoot Solar Engineers of Africa

    The Women Barefoot Solar Engineers of Africa aim to improve the lives of the rural poor living on less than $ 1 a day in remote inaccessible villages off the energy grids in the 21 least developed cou ...

    The Women Barefoot Solar Engineers of Africa aim to improve the lives of the rural poor living on less than $ 1 a day in remote inaccessible villages off the energy grids in the 21 least developed countries in Africa supplying their communities with clean, low cost, household lighting from solar energy. Since 2005 more than 140 women from Africa, many of them grandmothers, almost all of them illiterate, have trained at the Barefoot College in India. In 6 months, these women learned how to fabricate, install and maintain solar-powered household lighting systems, and have become Barefoot Solar Engineers transforming

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2010

    Contribution from Dato Ir. Lee Yee-Cheong, Malaysia

    In the GES 2010 Preview on this Panel, the Burden to ameliorate the adverse effects of Climate Change is placed on the Developing World. “Emission control by developing countries is becoming a key f ...

    In the GES 2010 Preview on this Panel, the Burden to ameliorate the adverse effects of Climate Change is placed on the Developing World. “Emission control by developing countries is becoming a key for effective mitigation of climate change, as those countries now account for more than a half of global emissions and are still expanding their energy infrastructure.” I beg to differ! The Burden rests primarily on the Developed World. The World in Year 2000 (According to Professor John Holdren, then Harvard, now Science Advisor to US President Obama) World Population >6.0 billion (i)   Rich

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2010

    Contingent Climate-Change Treaties

    We probably can’t deal successfully with climate change without a strong international treaty limiting greenhouse gas emissions. But getting such a treaty is hard. One important reason is that reduc ...

    We probably can’t deal successfully with climate change without a strong international treaty limiting greenhouse gas emissions. But getting such a treaty is hard. One important reason is that reducing emissions is economically costly, but the costs of reduction are not publicly known. Thus, if a treaty negotiator proposes that country A reduce its carbon emissions by x%, that country may well object - especially if it is a developing country - that to do so would be prohibitively expensive -- and the negotiator would be hard pressed to prove the country wrong. That is where a contingent treaty

    Polity

    Implemen- tations

    Implementation
    Symposium 2010

    Solar Shops in the Philippines

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society