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Symposium 2015

How to Build Sustainable Cities for the Next Urban Billion?

The Challenge

By 2050 the number of people living in cities will reach 6 billion. Existing cities will not be able to accommodate an estimated 2 billion people who will migrate from the countryside to urban centers seeking employment, education, and a better living standard. How to build the next 500 sustainable cities created by this rampant urbanization is among the greatest challenges of this century and it also represent one of the greatest opportunity to address a multitude of issues related to the environment, economic development, social advancement, medical infrastructure, and education.

Where will the next 500 new cities likely to be located? How to create efficient water, power and transit solutions? How can global information and communications technology help cities to improve resource efficiency? How can governments and businesses work together to generate creative solutions? How can regulatory framework be analyzed and improved to enable sustainable developments? What is the best available model for sustainable urban development in the world today that can be replicated?

This session is organized by Albert Ting, CX Technology Corporation, Taiwan. Please check out the tabs below for additional facts and information.

    Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2015

    Global Urbanization: A University’s Response

    Global Urbanization: A University’s Response

    Global Urbanization: A University’s Response

    Solution
    Symposium 2015

    How Investors and Professional Developers Can Help Build Sustainable Cities for the Next Urban Billion

    How Investors and Professional Developers Can Help Build Sustainable Cities for the Next Urban Billion

    How Investors and Professional Developers Can Help Build Sustainable Cities for the Next Urban Billion

    Background Paper

    Background Paper
    Symposium 2015

    How to Build Sustainable Cities for the Next Urban Billion?

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Virtual Library

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2015

    Building Sustainable Cities

    There are many different business strategies for addressing the challenges posed by rapid urbanization and scarce resources. Often they center on expanding supply—providing more water, more electric ...

    There are many different business strategies for addressing the challenges posed by rapid urbanization and scarce resources. Often they center on expanding supply—providing more water, more electricity, more roads, more vehicles. But increasingly businesses are discovering how to create and claim value by improving resource efficiency—through energy-performance contracting, for example, and other strategies that overcome business barriers, reduce waste, and stretch resources. The framework rests on three pillars: new business models that generate profits by optimizing the use of resources; financial engineering that encourages investments in efficiency and careful selection of markets. Although any given company’s approach will depend on its capabilities and objectives and the market it is entering, the broad strategies provided here are relevant both to obvious players such as infrastructure companies and vendors of turbines, trains, and other equipment, and to companies in larger sectors such as information technology, financial services, and building products. Whatever the industry, strategic investments in resource efficiency as cities are being built or rebuilt can generate value for companies over the long term while enhancing the cities’ competitiveness, livability, and environmental performance.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2015

    Making a Big Impact in a Big Hurry: Finance and Technology in Sustainable Cities

    Rapid growth in emerging economies means that right now, today, these nations are putting down the roads, bridges, water systems, power grids, and buildings that will determine their use of carbon, wa ...

    Rapid growth in emerging economies means that right now, today, these nations are putting down the roads, bridges, water systems, power grids, and buildings that will determine their use of carbon, water, and commuting time (and fuel) for decades. There is tremendous impact in investing in sustainability in the built environment – and in connected technologies – particularly in emerging markets. Interventions in water, electricity, and transit have the most investment leverage, for several reasons. First, they involve tangible assets which can be built and financed at large scale. Second, if families and businesses have water, electricity, and a way to get to work and to move goods, they can build on that foundation. Without water, electricity, and transit, none of the other smart urbanization interventions are possible. And finally, since these are physical goods, their use can be optimized and coordinated at very large scale.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2015

    The Fantastic Horizon: How To Invest in a New City

    Rapid urbanization and resource scarcity pose problems – and opportunities – for businesses and governments all over the world. The world’s existing population centers cannot absorb all the mig ...

    Rapid urbanization and resource scarcity pose problems – and opportunities – for businesses and governments all over the world. The world’s existing population centers cannot absorb all the migration, prompting the need for hundreds of new cities. This raises the question of who can best lead the building and developing of these municipalities. One course of action is development, promotion, and regulation by the private sector.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2015

    The Promise of Enterprise Cities

    The process of globalization and increased rates of urbanization are forcing countries to rethink their approach to economic policy. Widespread reluctance to implement comprehensive reforms and burden ...

    The process of globalization and increased rates of urbanization are forcing countries to rethink their approach to economic policy. Widespread reluctance to implement comprehensive reforms and burdensome legal and regulatory regimes are impediments to economic growth and entrepreneurship. Enterprise Cities, akin to free trade zones, are one possible solution to this problem. These are special jurisdictions with investor-friendly legal and regulatory policies that create the pre-conditions for entrepreneurship and stimulate competition based growth.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2015

    The Effect of Anticompetitive Market Distortions (ACMDs) on Global Markets

    This paper addresses the effect of anticompetitive market distortions (ACMDs) on global markets using case studies which show how measures such as a range of behind the border barriers and market dist ...

    This paper addresses the effect of anticompetitive market distortions (ACMDs) on global markets using case studies which show how measures such as a range of behind the border barriers and market distortions affect the efficiency of markets and impose welfare losses on these markets. Here, we mainly focus on how such measures may influence costs for distorted producers compared to non-distorted producers and how these cost differences affect market access, as well as consumer welfare within markets. This paper builds on “Enhancing Welfare by Attacking Anticompetitive Market Distortions” and lays out key issues describing global markets in a largely theoretical and partly empirical way thus allowing us to elaborate the key theme of ACMDs for future research. The paper will also evaluate the impact of ACMDs on welfare in the country itself.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2015

    Freeing the Global Market: How to Boost the Economy by Curbing Regulatory Distortions

    One of the most worrisome trends in international trade is the growing use of government-imposed anticompetitive market distortions (ACMDs) in advanced developing countries. The distortions harm some ...

    One of the most worrisome trends in international trade is the growing use of government-imposed anticompetitive market distortions (ACMDs) in advanced developing countries. The distortions harm some of the most valuable U.S. export interests and the welfare of consumers in the countries where they exist. Shanker Singham details the scale of the ACMD problem and a strategy for the United States to combat them.