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Symposium 2014

Entrepreneurial Ecosystems

The Challenge

Major international economic development organizations such as the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the United Nations agree that entrepreneurial success and the establishment of Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the developing world could alleviate many of the world’s social and economic problems. In a global economic environment characterized by lower growth and high levels of unemployment/under-employment, entrepreneurs are perceived as critical generators for jobs and innovations.

The concept of “entrepreneurial ecosystems” is relatively new amongst both policy-makers and academics, but it is now in vogue, and there are amazing innovations in this emerging field. Entrepreneurial ecosystems are similar to all complex adaptive systems; one component considered in isolation from the others does not suffice to differentiate a “good” entrepreneurial ecosystem from a “less supportive” one. Just as in biological ecosystems, it is the constant interaction of the components and the networks that are created, which define the ecosystem.

The many different elements that make up the entrepreneur’s ecosystem eventually contribute to the success, or failure, of an entrepreneurial venture. Interdependent factors such as local government policies, educational systems, family and social networks, business development programs, innovation hubs, financial institutions, research centers, local infrastructure, and cultural and social norms play fundamental roles in enabling or constraining entrepreneurship.

What distinctive traits seem to be present when entrepreneurship tends to thrive? What does network theory tell us about entrepreneurial ecosystems? To what extent are the great success stories (Silicon Valley, Route 128, etc.) replicable? What are the ideas and solutions that can facilitate and strengthen networks among the ecosystem stakeholders?

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    Using Network Models to develop vibrant Entrepreneurial Ecosystems

    Advances in Complexity Theory and Network Modeling can guide targeted policy recommendations that foster vibrant Entrepreneurial Ecosystems. Our team visited multiple major cities across Sub-Saharan A ...

    Advances in Complexity Theory and Network Modeling can guide targeted policy recommendations that foster vibrant Entrepreneurial Ecosystems. Our team visited multiple major cities across Sub-Saharan African in support of a previous project and, after back-to-back visits to Nairobi and Dar es Salaam, questioned why entrepreneurship seemed to thrive in some places but not others.  Based on this experience, we were motivated to better understand local entrepreneurial environments and wondered: “Can network modeling generate effective policy recommendations that influence Entrepreneurial Ecosystems so that they better facilitate the creation and success of start-up companies?” The 21st century has ushered in an unprecedented

    Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    Entrepreneurial Ecosystems

    Leverage existing Chambers of Commerce to fast track the development of hyper local Entrepreneurial Ecosystems. In order for an “entrepreneurial ecosystem” to take hold and thrive, it needs access ...

    Leverage existing Chambers of Commerce to fast track the development of hyper local Entrepreneurial Ecosystems. In order for an “entrepreneurial ecosystem” to take hold and thrive, it needs access to things like talent, mentors, capital, R & D, supportive government etc.. An EE also needs to be “native” and leverage it’s location and locations vertical strengths (Washington D.C. & Government, Boston & Bio Tech, Chicago & Trading etc.). Though Silicon Valley is a great success story, other cities around the world shouldn’t try and recreate Silicon Valley in their city or town. What they should create is their own ecosystem.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    Holistic approach to build and assess entrepreneurship ecosystems

    The rates of entrepreneurial activity vary significantly between countries (cf., GEM studies), regions and metropolitan regions. Various stakeholders, including scholars and politicians) have tried to ...

    The rates of entrepreneurial activity vary significantly between countries (cf., GEM studies), regions and metropolitan regions. Various stakeholders, including scholars and politicians) have tried to get a better understanding for why that might be the case, looking at a variety of factors. Over the past years, the concept of entrepreneurship ecosystems has emerged which seeks to describe the complex interplay of different factors and actors that constitute such an ecosystem (Isenberg, 2010; Mason & Brown, 2013; Vogel, 2013). Despite that fact that historically we would regard Silicon Valley as THE prototype entrepreneurship ecosystem, we increasingly develop the notion that there

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Background Paper

    Background Paper
    Symposium 2014

    Enhancing Social Capital

    This Background Paper gives some facts about demographics, the population of unemployed young dadults and the importance of SME's.

    This Background Paper gives some facts about demographics, the population of unemployed young dadults and the importance of SME's.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Virtual Library

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    Addressing the 100 Million Youth Challenge - Perspectives on Youth Employment in the Arab World in 2012

    Addressing the 100 Million Youth Challenge - Perspectives on Youth Employment in the Arab World in 2012 is being released at a moment when all countries across the Arab world, from the transition co ...

    Addressing the 100 Million Youth Challenge - Perspectives on Youth Employment in the Arab World in 2012 is being released at a moment when all countries across the Arab world, from the transition countries of North Africa to the Gulf Cooperation Council states, face the same economic mandate: support growth and create jobs. Job creation, a perennial challenge for the region is compounded by the region’s demographics, whereby 100 million youth between 15 and 29 years old representing 30% of the region’s, total population 2 are in dire need of an economic future which will support the conditions for human development, as well as vibrant and inclusive political life and social cohesion in the coming decades.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    Youth Employment and Economic Transition in Tunisia

    This paper analyzes trends in youth employment and unemployment in private sector development, with special attention to education and female employment. It uses data from a 2007 enterprise survey t ...

    This paper analyzes trends in youth employment and unemployment in private sector development, with special attention to education and female employment. It uses data from a 2007 enterprise survey to study the evolution of the MSE sector and that Tunisian MSEs are suffering from similar problems faced by the private sector gener - ally. The business environment has been plagued with corruption and many other imperfections and uncertain - ties, and was not conducive for substantial investment and enterprise creation. Small entrepreneurs, who are not well-connected to the old political elite, have been particularly hurt by the lack of clear rules and by rampant corruption. The paper argues for reforms of labor laws and of the financial sector in order to encourage MSEs to become formal and gain better access to credit. It also points out to huge inequalities between different regions in Tunisia (the poverty rate in the center west region is three times that in Tunis) and to a strong gender bias in the labor market (female labor market participation rate is 27 percent compared to 70 percent for males), and argues for special policies and programs to deal with them.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    Developing Network Models of Entrepreneurial Ecosystems in Developing Economies

    According to the I nternational M onetary F und ’s Perspectives on Youth Employment in the Arab World report, unemployment in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region is the highest in the worl ...

    According to the I nternational M onetary F und ’s Perspectives on Youth Employment in the Arab World report, unemployment in the Middle East/North Africa (MENA) region is the highest in the world and is largely a youth phenomenon. Overall unemployment is approximately 10% , but the youth rate stands at almost 25%.

    The report also states that over the past 50 years, MENA countries and Sub - Saharan Africa have had the highest labor force growth rates in the world due to a combination of large declines in infant mortality rates and high fertility rates. The number of MENA labor force entrants remains daunting – approximately 10.7 million new entrants are expected to join the labor force in the coming decade, compared with 10.2 million in the pre vious one.