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Symposium 2013

Proposal - Strategic workforce planning & Talent Management – Getting information of your current and future workforce to implement a best-fit Talent Management to be successful

The Challenge

In 2020 the majority of baby boomers (age group born between 1956 and 1965) retires. Together with the retirees, 50 years of working experience will disappear. Furthermore, work related values like jo ...

In 2020 the majority of baby boomers (age group born between 1956 and 1965) retires. Together with the retirees, 50 years of working experience will disappear. Furthermore, work related values like job guarantee, high income and power will disappear as well. Whereas the age group born between 1965 and 1981, known as Generation X, started to question these classic values and to bring up the term “Work-Life-Balance”,

Strategic workforce planning as a starting point for forecast and alignment of the demand for workforce (capacities and competencies) based on current and future business needs with the supply side of the workforce to get information of how to create the best-fit enablement strategy for their talent, creating additional value for them and the company.

We do have a generational shift within our workforce in the next years. The new generation has different values than the old. We don`t talk about Work-Life-Balance anymore, they do talk about “Life-Balancing”. Work is a partial segment of our life and with the new technology and the nearly limitless communication technology supporting it. The new generation are asking their employers: “what can you offer me?”, “can I do still do my voluntary work when I`m employed at your company?” This is only a small part of getting an idea how the new generation is thinking.

We focus two big problems within the next years: the older generation will leave the company with all of their knowledge and experience. The other one is that we have new generations; they have another learning experience and other values.

This results in a requirement to check our Talent Management. A starting point of doing this is strategic workforce planning – we need an idea of how our current and future workforce will look like. Where do they do the work for us? Which competencies do they need? Etc. When we have this information we need to check our Talent Management. Do we have the right instruments to enable our workforce to do the best possible job? Will those instruments satisfy the needs and ideas of our new generation employees? Do those instruments help shifting the knowledge and experience of the old generation to the new one?

We do not talk about mechanical Talent Management anymore – we need to talk about value based Talent Management; organic Talent Management. The difference is that the aim of mechanical Talent Management is to fill a job vacancy when it needs to be filled. Instead, the organic approach is more value based and focuses on the employee itself and his strength and is answering the question: Which is the right job for the employee to deliver his value add for being successful.

So, what to do now? The companies need to be aware of who they are and their values. After that, they need to think about who their workforce is and who it will be in the next years in order to create the best-fit Talent Management, instruments and programs which will cover the needs of all 4-generations, empowering them to find and develop their own strengths to be successful.

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