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Symposium 2013

Designing a Stable Euroland: The Corporate Perspective

The Challenge

It is obvious by now that the German economy is not immune to the on-going crisis: A severe drop in exports to the rest of the euro zone is hurting manufacturing. At the same time a combination of large-scale immigration and of capital inflows makes Germany look like a beneficiary of the gloom elsewhere. While the negative economic effects have so far been largely offset by rising domestic demand and exports to countries outside Europe, the longer-term consequences of the crisis may be severe: Economically, Germany will have difficulties to strive in a Europe in perma-crisis. Politically, Germany faces adverse reactions for the austerity it imposes on weaker partner countries.

This session puts a focus on the views of the German business community, which seems to be deeply divided over the euro crisis. Do big corporations basically agree with Mario Draghi's "whatever it takes" approach, while many entrepreneurs oppose this stance? Is a break-up of the euro zone preferable to taking ever bigger fiscal risks, as some business leaders have argued? What needs to be done to create a monetary union that is stable over the long-term? Is the envisioned banking union a necessary condition (and what should it look like in detail)? Does the euro area need elements of a federal state such as area-wide redistribution systems (e.g. a common unemployment insurance)? How can the currency area strike a viable balance between market discipline and institutional force? Are there alternative options for Europe’s future, for instance reintroducing national currencies while at the same time creating new common projects (e. g. setting up a european welfare state, common armed forces etc.)?

This session is part of the issue cluster "Fiscal and Financial Sustainability" and organized in cooperation with manager magazin.

    Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2013

    Improve eurozone competiveness and productivity

    Improve eurozone competiveness and productivity

    Improve eurozone competiveness and productivity

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2013

    Let market forces work in the eurozone

    Let market forces work in the eurozone

    Let market forces work in the eurozone

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2013

    Clean up and stabilize the European banking sector

    Clean up and stabilize the European banking sector

    Clean up and stabilize the European banking sector

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Solution
    Symposium 2013

    Strengthen common political institutions in the eurozone

    Strengthen common political institutions in the eurozone

    Strengthen common political institutions in the eurozone

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    Building on our strengths – Seizing Europe's growth opportunities

    Every time a brighter economic signal emanates from anywhere in Europe, politicians and scientists strike up yet another discussion about whether the crisis is at last drawing to a close. After a good ...

    Every time a brighter economic signal emanates from anywhere in Europe, politicians and scientists strike up yet another discussion about whether the crisis is at last drawing to a close. After a good three years of riding the roller coaster, that is understandable. Yet debating whether the beginning of a happy end has finally materialized puts us on the wrong foot. Europe does not have the luxury of taking a breather. Notions of any kind of stability are deceptive. Under severe pressure to manage the crisis, the EU spent the first half, if you will, putting together important reform packages

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    The Euro system at its current state: A threat to greater unity and prosperity

    The intentional breaking of rules und agreements, e.g. the permanent violation of the fundamental convergence criteria of the Stability & Growth Pact, by the European governments since the introductio ...

    The intentional breaking of rules und agreements, e.g. the permanent violation of the fundamental convergence criteria of the Stability & Growth Pact, by the European governments since the introduction of the Euro-currency has already weakened the economy of the member states. Furthermore the ongoing mismanagement of the resulting financial crisis will certainly result in more inflation in the medium term and shrinking wealth of the citizens in all parts of the Eurozone. The Euro which was intended as a tool for closer political integration of the European Union has turned out to create the opposite with additional tensions and increasing

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society