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Symposium 2014

Bringing Electricity to the Poor

The Challenge

About one fifth of the World’s population did not have access to electricity in 2010 (IEA, 2013).1 Though the International Energy Agency (IEA) predicts strong improvements in electricity coverage, 10–14% of the population in India and other developing countries in Asia will still have no access to electricity in 2030. These statistics are also not reflective of the millions of people who cannot access grid-provided electricity due to high costs and a lack of financial resources. They also exclude those who live in areas suffering from extensive daily power cuts; although technically “connected,” these people do not benefit from electrification in a real sense. Most of these people live in rural areas, and many belong to indigenous and tribal groups. These areas are not included in centralized grid development efforts by governments and multilaterals.

People without access to electricity do not have easy access to hot water, water pumps, clean cooking and lighting, or telecommunication. For them the solutions of using kerosene, candles, and batteries are both costly and inadequate. Traveling long distances to buy these items or collecting fire-wood is time consuming; it is often the task of women and children which reduces their time for economic participation and education. In addition, their health is most negatively impaired because they are directly exposed to soot from cooking with biomass and the fumes of crude kerosene-burning lanterns. Without electricity, the preparation of hot water for daily hygiene is an extravagance. Additionally, without electricity, overall productivity remains at low levels. Electricity increases the productivity of all sectors, from the agricultural sector via enhanced irrigation, to mechanization in the industrial sector. Access to electricity is therefore a key factor for providing sanitation and reducing air pollution, which in turn provide for healthier living as well as for economic and social development. Furthermore, access to information through mobile phones is an important tool in rural remote communities. Mobile phones have become a financial vehicle, an educational tool, and have provided direct eco-nomic support to other activities. No access to electricity therefore means no connectivity.

 


1 http://www.worldenergyoutlook.org/resources/energydevelopment/globalstatusofmodernenergyaccess/

    Solutions

    Solution
    Symposium 2014

    Training mature women from poor communities as solar engineers

    Training mature women from poor communities as solar engineers

    Training mature women from poor communities as solar engineers

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    Innovating grassroots solutions to enable clean electricity access to the poor

    Developing & fostering grassroots solutions through bottom-up policies to bring electricity to the global South poor and ensure equitable and sustainable economic development Twenty years since Rio, w ...

    Developing & fostering grassroots solutions through bottom-up policies to bring electricity to the global South poor and ensure equitable and sustainable economic development Twenty years since Rio, we are still struggling to develop a world with equitable and sustainable electricity access utilizing the global commons. In 2011, almost one in five of the World’s population - or roughly 1.3 billion people - did not have access to electricity. Additionally, there may be equal number of families who though have electricity connections, but are deprived of reliable and affordable electricity due to brownouts and blackouts. If we map these numbers, they

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    Bringing Electricity to the Poor

    Background: Indonesia which consist of more than 17,000 islands as an archipelago facing a huge problem of providing basic infrastructure to their people, including electricity provision. Up till now ...

    Background: Indonesia which consist of more than 17,000 islands as an archipelago facing a huge problem of providing basic infrastructure to their people, including electricity provision. Up till now only 80% of Indonesians have electricity connection compare to Malaysia and Singapore who’s their people has already reach 100% ratio electrification. Per capita usage is also very low, it is only 800 kWh and the country like Korea where its industry is robust consume up to 10,000 kWh. In 2017, there will be an electricity crisis in Java due to the growth of electricity demand increase all the time so that

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2014

    The Barefoot College: Empower women as environmental stewards, de-centralize and de-mystify energy technologies.

    “To deprive a man of his natural liberty and to deny to him the ordinary amenities of life is worse then starving the body; it is starvation of the soul……..” M Gandhi Can governments, communit ...

    “To deprive a man of his natural liberty and to deny to him the ordinary amenities of life is worse then starving the body; it is starvation of the soul……..” M Gandhi Can governments, communities, and businesses cooperate in financing, designing and operating the necessary electricity infrastructure in the developing world? No I do not believe it is possible to design any solutions for Access to Energy for ALL that do not, at their base include the “individual” as a constituent. Solutions for the base of the pyramid cannot be “designed” from above, they must be listened to and developed

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Background Paper

    Background Paper
    Symposium 2014

    Bringing Electricity to the Poor

    In 2011, 19% of the world’s population did not have access to electricity (about 1.3 billion people) and 39% did not have access to clean cooking facilities (about 2.7 billion people).

    In 2011, 19% of the world’s population did not have access to electricity (about 1.3 billion people) and 39% did not have access to clean cooking facilities (about 2.7 billion people).

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Background Paper
    Symposium 2014

    Bringing Electricity to the Poor

    Malaysia is experiencing globalisation and urbanisation similar with the rest of the world, hence the growth of good infrastructure including in electricity reticulation system. However, there still e ...

    Malaysia is experiencing globalisation and urbanisation similar with the rest of the world, hence the growth of good infrastructure including in electricity reticulation system. However, there still exist poor community in rural and isolated area which are still deprived of basic necessities including electricity amidst a very small percentage (<0.01% in Peninsular Malaysia). Electricity form the basic requirements to enable growth in economy, education and health and the overall socio economic well being of the poor and needy.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Virtual Library

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    Energize the bottom of the pyramid – Energy Business Model Generator for low-income markets

    This practitioners’ guide is a comprehensive overview of challenges, barriers, and solutions for providing the 4 billion people who live on less than $8 per day with affordable and clean electricity ...

    This practitioners’ guide is a comprehensive overview of challenges, barriers, and solutions for providing the 4 billion people who live on less than $8 per day with affordable and clean electricity. It looks at a broad range of issues from legal barriers and infrastructure shortcomings to insufficient knowledge of both local staff as well as consumers. It highlights very well the multi-dimensionality of the problem of providing access to electricity in developing countries and includes several case studies.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    WEO Energy for all: financing access for the poor

    The World Energy Outlook is the most comprehensive collection of data on energy. In this special excerpt, the IEA looks at the current state of access to electricity and discusses especially how unive ...

    The World Energy Outlook is the most comprehensive collection of data on energy. In this special excerpt, the IEA looks at the current state of access to electricity and discusses especially how universal access could be financed. $48 billion annual investment until 2030 would be necessary to provide universal access. For 2009, however, they diagnose a shortcoming of about $39 billion in actual investment.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    WHO Household air pollution and health factsheet

    In this factsheet, the WHO collected data on the health impacts of household air pollution from cooking and heating with solid fuel. For example, more than half of premature deaths among children unde ...

    In this factsheet, the WHO collected data on the health impacts of household air pollution from cooking and heating with solid fuel. For example, more than half of premature deaths among children under 5 are due to pneumonia caused by particulate matter (soot) inhaled from household air pollution. These negative health impacts could be avoided by providing access to clean energy for these households.