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Symposium 2014

The Dimensions of Integration in ASEAN

The Challenge

The economic integration of the 10 ASEAN member countries in 2015 is viewed as a major step in the formation of a new regional block. To date, the discussion has largely focused on trade and business benefits with the assumption that these will lead to increased prosperity for all. Expectations are great as the region’s population is expected to grow from 650 million today to about a billion by 2050. However other criteria of integration, such as social and cultural aspects for example, are vital for the expected benefits to become reality and are in many ways just as important to the success of the economic integration.

At a time when unacceptable acts of religious and cultural intolerance appear to be sowing the seeds of fear and claiming all the headlines, it is important to remember that the region is perhaps unique in the world in terms of its diversity.

How can the efforts of the majority to celebrate diversity rather than create divisions succeed? Should the divergence of cultures be avoided? What roles must the governments and communities in the region play in recognizing the need for social and cultural assimilation if the economic benefits are to be fully realized? What are the current problems that hinder anyone from celebrating diversity? Are there any? Do we really need (and want) social and cultural assimilation and is it the only way towards economic prosperity? More generally, where does ASEAN currently fail, where are problems to be expected, and are there already suggestions to how failure can be prevented?

    Background Paper

    Background Paper
    Symposium 2014

    ASEAN 2030 - Toward a Borderless Economic Community

    This study, which analyzes long-term economic development aspirations, challenges, and policy options for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), was conducted by the Asian Development Ban ...

    This study, which analyzes long-term economic development aspirations, challenges, and policy options for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), was conducted by the Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI), in close consultation with the ASEAN Secretariat and the Asian Development Bank. It is a companion work to the ADB/ADBI study ASEAN, PRC, and India: The Great Transformation.

    Consultative Approach
    The study used a consultative approach to identify the region’s 2030 growth aspirations and development challenges. After brainstorming meetings at ADB, the ASEAN Secretariat, and ADBI, seminars were held at the ASEAN Studies Centers in Washington, DC and Jakarta. The study largely benefited from consultation missions held in each ASEAN member country in 2011 and 2012, engaging with local policymakers, scholars, the civil society, think tanks, and other stakeholders. ADB resident missions provided inputs and technical support.

    Inputs and Governance
    Ten background papers were prepared on each ASEAN member country’s perspectives and 29 other background papers were commissioned on thematic issues. ADB’s Economics and Research Department prepared growth projections. A team of experts reviewed the quality of background papers and the final report. The ASEAN High-Level Task Force on Economic Integration provided guidance and ideas regularly.

    ASEAN Think Tanks Involved in the Study
    Cambodia Development Resource Institute, Phnom Penh; National Economic Research Institute, Vientiane; Centre for Strategic and International Studies, Jakarta; Institute of Strategic and International Studies, Kuala Lumpur; Myanmar Development Resource Institute, Yangon; Philippine Institute for Development Studies, Manila; Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, Singapore; Thailand Development Research Institute, Bangkok; Central Institute for Economic Management, Ha Noi; and the Economic Research Institute for ASEAN and East Asia, Jakarta.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society

    Virtual Library

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    Sec-Gen Surin: ASEAN Identity, Cultural Integration As Important As Economics To Avoid Conflict

    In a frank and forthright SWOT analysis of the future of regional integration, ASEAN Secretary-General Dr Surin Pitsuwan has warned that the birth of the ASEAN Community will create both “winners an ...

    In a frank and forthright SWOT analysis of the future of regional integration, ASEAN Secretary-General Dr Surin Pitsuwan has warned that the birth of the ASEAN Community will create both “winners and losers”, and the management of ethnic, religious and identity differences in one of the world’s most culturally diverse regions will be equally as important as creating economic opportunities.

    Virtual Library File
    Symposium 2014

    Fact Sheet: ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community (ASCC)

    Human Development Social Welfare and Protection Social Justice and Rights Ensuring Environmental Sustainability Building ASEAN Identity Narrowing the Development Gap   The ASEAN Socio-Cultural ...

    • Human Development
    • Social Welfare and Protection
    • Social Justice and Rights
    • Ensuring Environmental Sustainability
    • Building ASEAN Identity
    • Narrowing the Development Gap

     

    The ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community aims to contribute to an ASEAN Community that is people-oriented and socially responsible with a view to achieving enduring solidarity and unity among the peoples and Member States of ASEAN. It seeks to forge a common identity and build a caring and sharing society which is inclusive and where the well-being, livelihood, and welfare of the peoples are enhanced. The ASCC strives to bring out the human dimension of ASEAN cooperation and an abiding commitment to address the region’s aspiration to lift the quality of life for its people. The character and depth of cooperation are critical to bring ASEAN closer to peoples’ heart and to promote a caring and sharing ASEAN Community. The ASCC Blueprint (2009-2015) provides a framework to strengthen the ASEAN Community’s belief in their peoples, appreciation of their shared cultural heritage, uphold and extol shared values, and strengthen the capacities and effectiveness of their institutions.

    The ASCC Blueprint provides strategic directions in key focus areas: