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Symposium 2013

Beyond Individualism toward Social Responsibility

The Challenge

The world is in trouble. On many fronts – from climate change to resource depletion, from banking crises to sovereign debt crises, from deficient education to poverty in the midst of plenty, from energy security to food security, from fragile states to weapons proliferation, and more – we are not successfully engaging with the challenges of the 21st century. Our economies are not overcoming the scourge of poverty, the inadequate provision of collective goods (such as public education, environmental services, fish stocks and rain forests), our societies are increasingly fragmented, and our governance structures are inadequate to the problems we face.

We have probably gone this far as we can in creating win-win situations among self-centered, materialistic, rational, individualistic agents. The resulting cooperation is insufficient to overcome the growing problems we face economically, environmentally, socially and politically. The time has come to gain a profounder understanding of human potential for care and to explore the resulting opportunities for human cooperation. Through a better insight into who we are we may attain more understanding of who we could become.

On this basis, policymakers may need to redefine their objectives and instruments. Is more to economic policy than providing public goods, regulating common property resources, redistributing income, and stabilizing the macro-economy? How can policymakers promote the drive to cooperate by encouraging a spirit of care? Do market systems over-stimulate our competitive and acquisitive motivations? What social context can be created to bring these motivations into a more healthy balance with our caring and altruistic motivations? What are the implications for education, occupational training and business practice? What policies and institutions help widen our circles of moral responsibility? How can we build economies that promote people’s capacities to thrive, through close and satisfying personal relationships, opportunities for personal growth, and opportunities to put their distinctive abilities in the service of something larger than they are?

Part of the issue cluster "New Opportunities for Global Cooperation"

    Proposals

    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    Develop a CSR certification (e.g. Iso 9000)

    Engaging SME's and mid size businesses further in developing a socially responsible attitude, may well be foster by the creation of a SR certification (e.g. Iso) that would allow them to apply best pr ...

    Engaging SME's and mid size businesses further in developing a socially responsible attitude, may well be foster by the creation of a SR certification (e.g. Iso) that would allow them to apply best practices and get credited for it.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    First Proposed Solution for Beyond Individualism to Social Responsibilities

    Regulation of important consumer decisions or the provision of economic incentives (subsidies or taxes) can be costly, either politically or fiscally. Choice architecture offers a “cheaper” and of ...

    Regulation of important consumer decisions or the provision of economic incentives (subsidies or taxes) can be costly, either politically or fiscally. Choice architecture offers a “cheaper” and oftentimes more effective way to achieve the same objective. Choice architecture works by creating on-line or physical decision settings and contexts for consequential decisions that either (a) maximize the likelihood that the decision maker’s social and environmental values and goals will be active and used by appropriate decision processes (e.g., by using group settings for such decisions that prime social values and responsibility), or (b) make selection of socially and environmentally responsible choice

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    Second Proposed Solution for Beyond Individualism to Social Responsibilities

    Educate policy makers that public opinion about policy options is changeable and that initial opposition to any change should be expected. However, after implementation of change that noticeably incre ...

    Educate policy makers that public opinion about policy options is changeable and that initial opposition to any change should be expected. However, after implementation of change that noticeably increases public welfare, initial opposition can be expected to change to support within a timeframe of months, not years, which should give politicians the courage to lead rather than follow public opinion, without the fear to not get reelected. Background social science facts for this solution Another important issue is the role of politicians and policy makers in this process. Just as individuals outsource other decisions to specialists (medical decisions to doctors,

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    Third Proposed Solution for Beyond Individualism to Social Responsibilities

    Use insights about choice architecture and the priming of social goals to more effective target private and institutional investments in financial markets to increase corporate social responsibility. ...

    Use insights about choice architecture and the priming of social goals to more effective target private and institutional investments in financial markets to increase corporate social responsibility. CSR investment funds are a step in that direction, but much needs to be done in terms of presentation of such investment options and choice architecture, to increase the uptake of such investment options by the public, to influence corporate social responsibility. Selected institutions (e.g., universities and their endowments, and pension funds) have time horizons and goals that resonate to those of CSR and should be targeted.

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    Prerequisites to a New Economics: Nurturant Values and Systemic Causation

    A new economics requires going beyond specific issues in two ways: articulating the nurturant versus strict values systems underlying policy and researching systemic causation across issue areas and a ...

    A new economics requires going beyond specific issues in two ways: articulating the nurturant versus strict values systems underlying policy and researching systemic causation across issue areas and across direct actions.   Economics is fundamentally about goals, resources, and optimal actions for using those resources to achieve those goals. All of these are moral in nature, and all make use of frames and metaphors in specific situations. They correspondingly characterize different understandings of democracy. The progressive moral system is nurturant, based on empathy, both social and personal responsibility, and an ethic of excellence (doing one’s best). These values assume that

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society
    Proposal
    Symposium 2013

    You want to change the world economy? Start from your own family economy...

    You want to change the world economy? Start from your own family economy... And here is the solution; these are the basic steps that every person can take.How? Do not wait for solutions from authoriti ...

    You want to change the world economy? Start from your own family economy... And here is the solution; these are the basic steps that every person can take.How? Do not wait for solutions from authorities, instead, do it on your own, participate with your own resources, and set the wheels on motion. Start from your own children, family and neighborhood. Be the best model for your own kids. Let’s go back to essentially from the family perspective. If we want society without serious handicaps, we then need to raise healthy and educated children. We must provide a lot of love

    Polity, Academia, Business, Civil Society